Merchant & Manufacture

Thomas M. Easterly Brattleboro From Wantastiquet Thomas Easterly, Daguerreotype Taken 1844-5 Thomas Martin Easterly was born in Guilford, Vermont to Tunis and Philomela Easterly on October 31, 1809. Easterly first taught calligraphy and penmanship, residing in Montpelier, Vermont from October 1835 through the following April, with customers such as E. P. Walton. With an extensive practice by 1838, and teaching practical business handwriting chiefly at the blackboard in the...
Old Book-Store And The American House, 1907 The Brattleboro Bookstore William Fessenden died suddenly in Northampton, Massachusetts on January 20, 1815. His widow was Patty Holbrook, the daughter of John Holbrook of Brattleboro. Mrs. Patty Fessenden owned the large two-and-a-half story brick building that William had built specifically for a bookstore. This bookstore is mentioned in an August 20, 1817 deed that was drawn up when Patty Fessenden bought...
Edward Crosby's Flour Mill In Summer 1857 New Connecticut River Bridge Partly Built Robert Pender's Fort On Wantastiquet Peak History Of The Building. The old mill building was originally a Baptist church in Guilford, and stood on the hill between the places now known as Guilford Centre and Hinesburg. It was probably built by Gov. Carpenter, the great-grandfather of E. P. Carpenter. At any rate it stood close by...
Then and Now. Mr. Editor:---Some 40 years since, there was a young, industrious and thriving mechanic, whose shop was situated in a New Enland village....
Elliot Street, Summer 1864 To Summer 1869 Orion Clark's barber pole angles out from his house near a great sycamore tree. A man with boots peers into a shop window at the left and another person stands on the far side of Main Street. The driver who holds the reins on top of the coach has a beaver top hat and a dark mustache. He has one passenger, who...
The Old Mill Ruins The factory built by the New England Furniture Company--- Centreville Store About 1910 Old Mill-Factory Swedesville In Distance...
John H. Chamberlain's Stables In 1894 Crosby & Rice's New "Harmony Block." ---The majority of our citizens are, perhaps, not aware of the improvements that have been going on in the rear of Crosby Block, during the past season, confined as the scene of operations is by Brooks, Crosby and Market Blocks and the engine house. But now that the work is approaching completion, it is fitting that the...
From The Federal Galaxy William Stow was the son of William and Rebecca Stow of Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. He was baptised in Christ Church on October 17, 1756. According to Hamilton Child's "Gazetteer of Windham County", Stow was "a Revolutionary War hero". The Boston City Directory for 1789 lists William Stow as a hatter, at No. 17 Ann-street. William Stow was appointed as Hayward for the Town of Brattleboro...
A Remarkable Case. Fifty-Two Years A Workingman In The Employ Of One Firm--- Confidence, Respect And Fortune The Result. At the present time when the daily press is so full of strife going on among the laboring men of the country, it is of interest to record the circumstances connected with the life of the man whose picture we here present, who has nearly completed his fifty-second year of...
Caleb Lysander Howe Veteran Photographer Gone. Death of C. L. Howe of Brattleboro--- Interesting Sketch of His Life. C. L. Howe, the old photographer of Brattleboro, died at his home on Harris place there last week Thursday. His death was not unexpected, as he had been in feeble health for several months, and each succeeding day found him growing weaker. The news was cabled to his daughter, Mrs Mary...
_____________________________________________________________________________ Seth Wells Cheney "Very young, slim, with a long face, a somewhat projecting chin, and firm lips. His eyes were most expressive, all soul. Hair light, silky, flowing, and voice clear. More poetry in him than in John. This appeared in the engravings." "He was fine; never angry, not once. He was fond of humor, enjoying a good laugh. He used to say, 'The dinner is half a man's...
John Burnham's Brass Foundry Caleb Lysander Howe Photograph 1856 The shadows on the front of the building show that the sun is almost directly overhead on a summer day. Had Caleb Howe capped the lens five minutes later, the shadow falling from the roof eave would have dropped, to reveal the words painted on the lower part of the board. Coin Silver Spoons For I. R. Wilder Burnham Foundry...
West Brattleboro. A Pleasant Place Of Summer Resort Near Home. West Brattleboro, Vt., August 1870. It has been said that the extreme heat of the season has, this year, driven the greater crowd seaward, but in my own rambles, I have seen little to confirm such an impression. In this direction there is certainly no percepible thinning out as yet. And why should there be when fresh breezes and...
Franklin H. Wheeler's 1894 Spring Street Garden A Leaf From Local History. Reminiscences of the Venerable F. H. Wheeler--- Some of the Citizens and Business Enterprises of 75 Years Ago. Probably there are not to exceed a dozen persons in the town who remain to recall the local events of 1824. The American house at that time was known as Uriel Sykes' tavern, and upon its enlargement, was given...
For Forty-Seven Years. In Brattleboro Trade--How Business Used to be Done-- Interesting Reminicences of Old Brattleboro-- Suggested by the Retirement of Dea. C. F. Thompson. The Thompson business was established in its present location in 1835 by Nathan B. Williston, who had been in the same business some 8 or 10 years before in a small wooden building standing about on the present site of the Episcopal church grounds,...
The old Shoe Peg Factory was located in the Centerville section of Brattleboro on Brook Road. It is now known as Williams Street. Part of the Brook Road community ran along the Whetstone Brook which was dotted in the nineteenth century with mills and factories. The Shoe Peg Factory was built on a very desirable place on the edge of the brook, had the use of the dam behind...
Brattleboro Meat Market -- Our village readers are ere this, doubtless informed of the fact, evidence of which may be found in our advertising columns, that our meat market has passed into new hands. We think we can with safety promise, that Messrs. Hadley and Sargeant, will work a needful reform in this department of our domestic economy, about which there has been great dissatisfaction. Heretofore, the policy of...
Our Village. ---There is perhaps no spot on the whole valley of the Connecticut, that strikes the eye of the stranger so pleasantly, as our own unpretending, but bustling little village. The houses are grouped together so naturally as to form a very picturesque view from the hill that overhangs the village; and as you step from the busy street to the 'common,' the open view of the distant...
After 70 years or more of continuous service the old overshot water wheel which has turned the machinery in the Stellman machine shop on Arch street, formerly the Hines & Newman shop, has finished its work. The old wheel, which was 18 feet in diamenter with buckets six feet wide, broke in two a few days ago in its dark quarters in the basement of the building, the iron...
A Reminder of the Olden Time. A Scheme for a Horse Railroad from Boston to Brattleboro Way Back in 1828. The death this winter of Cyrus Felton, the antiquarian of Marlboro, Mass. brings to mind one of the choice bits of local history which he unearthed and announced in September, but which failed of the notice it deserved. It was no less than a project to build a horse-railroad...
One evening in the autumn of 1837, a carriage propelled by an unseen power, with two gentlemen seated therein, passed rapidly through the streets of this village. The movements of this strange looking vehicle seemed to be perfectly under the control of it occupants. It would go up and down hill with apparent ease, and occupied much less space when turning around to go the opposite direction than a...
Town's Business and Large Industries Described. Four Distilleries, Three Military Companies, Largest Printing Office in the State. Among the historical books of the late Gen. Herbert B. Titus, was a gazetteer of the state of Vermont, "containing a brief general view of the state, a historical and topographical description of all the counties, towns, rivers &c., together with a map and several other engravings by Zaddock Thompson, A. B."...
James Fisk, Sr. _____________________________________________________________________________ An Extensive Establishment. Speaking of peddlers reminds us of the times of our boyhood when some perigrinating Yankee, with a tin trunk in each hand sustained chiefly by a strap or a sap yoke passing over the shoulders, would stop at the country farm-houses and express a wish to exchange pins, needles or thread for old gold, silver, or for recognized currency; or to the...
Learns To Make Lead Pipe and Pumps-- How and Why He Came to Brattleboro. At 17 young Estey went to Worcester and learned of Thomas Sutton what would now be called the plumber's trade. At that time this consisted of the making and putting in of lead pipe and copper pumps. By the primitive methods of those days lead pipe was made by pouring the melted lead into a...
The Earliest Telegraphing In Brattleboro. Interesting Reminiscences from J. H. Capen, the First Operator--- Amusing Terror at the Mysterious Fluid--- Despatches Between Lincoln and Holbrook--- Bogus War News and Some Patriotic Old Democrats That Cheered. Brattleboro's first telegraph operator was James H. Capen, who, if not the first, was certainly one of the first, to use the telegraph in Vermont. His first message was sent from a little room...
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