Dr. John Locke Dickerman


PortraitOfABrattleboroGentleman,Dr.JohnLockeDickerman,ByHoraceBundy,1848.jpg

Dr. John Locke Dickerman

Portrait 1848 By Horace Bundy


In a meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Brattleboro Free Library association Tuesday night it was voted to accept two oil paintings and a copy of the Dickerman genealogy from P. F. Connors, who went a short time ago to live with his sister in Providence, R. I. The paintings are of ancestors of Mrs. Connors, who was Sarah Dickerman, a great-granddaughter of Dr. John Dickerman, the first physician to practice in Brattleboro.


Vermont Phoenix, January 24, 1919.


This portrait of Dr. John Locke Dickerman has been mistakenly identified as Dr. Lemuel Dickerman (1751-1832). Since Horace Bundy was born in 1814 and did not paint his first portrait until he was twenty-five years old---seven years after Dr. Lemuel Dickerman died---there has been an egregious research error associated with this portrait.


The portrait of Dr. John L. Dickerman's wife has been removed from the Library.


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The Town of Brattleboro paid Dr. John Locke Dickerman for treating town paupers---for attendance and medicines. The care for the town paupers was for one year, rotated through resident physicians. Dr. Dickerman's payment orders were given by Brattleboro for the following patients---


Fany Beeby, February 6, 1815
O. Connor, May 20, 1822
Henry Haynes, March 3 and September 18, 1826
James Larrabee, October 14, 1826
Submit Amsden, May 5, 1829
D. Horton, February 25, 1832
Rachel Briggs, February 25, 1832
Lovina Hazelton, March 2, 1832


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The Dickerman family house stood at the point of land formed by North Main Street and Asylum Street until the fire that destroyed it in 1834.


Dr. Dickerman then lived on the South Main Street hill. A person named John L. Dickerman, Jr. is entered in the Windham County Court records as convicted along with three others, of stoning the house of Dr. John Wilson in August 1836, damaging the roof, clapboards, and windows---with Dr. Wilson and a woman inside.


Dr. John Wilson's house was situated below, along the old road to Vernon---one of the earliest constructions with "balloon framing" in Brattleboro. A medical receipt shows Dr. Wilson's fee for his consultation on one case with Dr. John L. Dickerman.


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