Wilkins Lilley Billiard Saloon 1860


Main Street Sidewalk Signs, George Harper Houghton Photograph, Civil War Times.jpg


An Episode.---A man calling himself "Dudley Kavanaugh the celebrated billiard player," got introduced to the "solid men" of this village, on Wednesday, and to our friend Lilley in particular, who threw open his Billiard Saloon, lager included, "free gratis for nothing" on the momentous occasion. During this time the way the balls chased each other over the table and cut up all sorts of astonishing antics couldn't be beat; even the Frenchman Berger, would have been astonished thereat.


Unluckily for the reputation of this renowned Kavanaugh, Wilkes' Spirit made its appearance that evening at the counter of neighbor Carpenter with a "dogtype" of the veritable Kavanaugh which resembles his travelling namesake about as much as the moon resembles a "green cheese."---The "solid men" aforesaid voted unanimously that they were completely sold.


---It subsequently appeared that the name of this pseudo "Kavanaugh" was George T. Batterson of Hartford, Ct. Through the instrumentality of a friend he was led to indulge in the joke of personating the celebrated billiard player. He is intimately acquainted with Phelan, Kavanaugh, Chrystal, and other notorieties in the billiard line, and thus was able to pass successfully the criticism and cross questioning of our friend Lilley.


But suspicions were all allayed, and Kavanaugh, alias Batterson was treated by his brother in the profession to an excellent dinner with all the necessary "fixins"; his bills were all paid and he was made a welcome guest. We imagine some of Batterson's Hartford friends will be regaled with a narrative of his adventures.


Vermont Phoenix, December 1, 1860.


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George Tomlinson Batterson was born January 24, 1830 in Wintonbury, Connecticut to Simeon Seeley Batterson and Melissa Roberts. He died on April 16, 1889. Wilkins Lilley's billiard saloon was in the Jonas Cutler block on the east lower Main Street hill. With the War of the Rebellion, the name was changed to the Union Billiard Hall, as seen in the photograph by George Harper Houghton.


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