H. M. S. Pinafore 1879

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Fred Cressy As Dick Deadeye

H. M. S. Pinafore; or, The Lass That Loved A Sailor

W. S. Gilbert And Arthur Seymour Sullivan

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---Pinafore, the everywhere popular opera, was brought out very successfully last week by the juvenile talent of the village. There was a large attendance Thursday evening and in addition to the matinee Friday afternoon, the entertainment, by request, was repeated Friday evening. The young performers entered into the spirit of the play with great heartiness, and presented its humorous peculiarities even better than professionals. For the excellent demeanor of the young actors on the stage, their promptness and self-command in dialogue, much credit is due to Miss Mary Harris who had charge of this part of the preparation. But the thorough mastering of the music, both in the solos and choruses, under the skillful drilling of Mrs Holbrook, surprised and delighted all presenjt. Miss Mamie Howe, as "Josephine," was the star of the play, and by her strong, yet sympathetic voice, so remarkable in a child of eleven years, charmed all who listeened. Miss Belle Clarke was a bright and piquant "Hebe," and Gracie Mansur, as "Little Buttercup," touched all hearts by her sweet voice and winsome ways. Harry Wright, in ancient costume, personated Sir Joseph Porter capitally, maintaining his calm and unemotional demeanor under all circumstances. A warm welcome greeted the "Captain of the Pinafore," Will Schuster, as he made his appearance on the poop deck. His voice came out full and clear and his acting was unaffected and energetic. Clifton Sherman, as Ralph Rackstraw, had the most difficult role, and it is greatly to his credit that he succeeded so well. "Dick Deadeye" was admirably personated by Fred Cressy, and the "Bosen," Fred Hastings, was the life of the crew and sang the famous solo, "For he is an Englishman," very finely. Every part was performed well and with a success which called out frequent bursts of applause and showers of bouquets. The fitting and beautiful scenery in the background was the work of C. H. Miller of this place. The opening operetta, "Bobby Shafto," was very pleasingly rendered by Blanche Kesler as "Bobby," in sailor's dress; Hattie Holden, as "Mabel," and Florence Clark as "Peasant girl," and the chorus of dancing peasants presented a most beautiful scene. The financial success of the several entertainments was very satisfactory, and well deserved by all concerned in the labor and expense attendent upon the preparations. The pleasure long anticipated of listening to the Brattleboro juveniles in Pinafore has been more than realized.


Vermont Record And Farmer, July 17, 1879.

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H. M. S. Pinafore.


---The event of the past week has been the representations given in the town hall on Thursday and Friday evenings, with a matinee on Friday, by the youthful crew of H. M. S. Pinafore, under the direction and for the benefit of Mrs. Holbrook. That so perfect a rendering of this little opera could be given by our youthful talent is a matter of surprise to every one. Reflection will show, however, that this is one of the results of the careful musical training given in our public schools, where the necessary independence for the rendering of concerted passages is acquired, and from which schools the crew was largely, if not entirely, taken. If the singing, both solo and chorus, awakened the astonishment of the audience, the ease and aplomb with which these youthful actors brought out all the points which render this opera so irresistibly funny, aroused the wildest enthusiasm. To the faithfulness of the children, as well as to the intelligent and untiring training of the ladies in charge (Miss Harris having kindly undertaken the stage arrangements), is due the compliment coming from various quarters, to the effect that these representations compared favorably with those given by children at the Boston Museum, while certain of the solo parts were vastly superior to those in the Museum cast.


Dramatis Personae.


Sir Joseph Porter, K. C. B. ____________Harry Wright, age 13
Captain Corcoran, ___________________Willie Schuster, " 13
Ralph Rackstraw, ____________________Clifton Sherman, " 12
Dick Deadeye, ______________________Fred Cressy, " 12
Boatswain, _________________________Fred Hastings, " 14
Tom Tucker, midshipman, _____________Frank Wright, " 10
Josephine, _________________________Mamie Howe, " 11
Little Buttercup, ______________________Gracie Mansur, " 11
Cousin Hebe, _______________________Belle Clarke, " 13


Bobby Shafto.


Bobby Shafto, __________________Blanche Kesler, age 10
Mabel, ________________________Hattie Holden, " 10
Peasant Girl, ___________________Florence Clarke, " 6


"Bobby Shafto," given with the above cast and a chorus of peasants, was a decided success, while Master Clifford Wright's version of the Admiral's Song brought down the house.


Vermont Phoenix, July 18, 1879.

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Bobby Shafto's gone to sea,
Silver buckles at his knee,
He'll come back and marry me,
Bonny Bobby Shafto!

Bobby Shafto's bright and fair,
Panning out his yellow hair,
He's my love for evermore,
Bonny Bobby Shafto!

Bobby Shafto's getten a bairn,
For to dangle on his arm,
In his arm and on his knee,
Bobby Shafto loves me.

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Poster For An American Production 1879

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