Town Hall Antique Show 1857


Antique Festival.---The members of Rev. D. W. C. Huntington's Society, (Methodist,) held their annual Festival at the Town Hall, on Thursday evening of last week. It was in most respects a happy representation of olden time---days that are hallowed in the memories of the middle aged by their genuine and hearty, though home-bred, hospitality.


The table was loaded to repletion and with "biled vittles" served on pewter platters, tin pans filled with baked beans,---New England's characteristic dish,---wooden trays of hulled corn, plates of overgrown doughnuts, and other like edibles that would give the dyspeptic stomachs of this age many a fitful twinge.


Conspicuous among the souvenirs of other days, were the cards, distaff and spinning-wheel of our grand-mothers, and the flax-break and swingle-board of our paternal ancestors. These implements were plied by men and women dressed in a style corresponding with the fashions of the age, when such now unfashionable implements, were in good repute.


The cocked hat and small clothes of the men, and the absence of expanding skirts, hoops and crinoline, in the garments of the women, carried us back to the age represented by the boyhood of the "oldest inhabitant." At that time "young ladies" were not known; the place these dear creatures now occupy in society was filled by a class of strong, sensible young women altogether unlike the "lilies of the valley," inasmuch as they toiled, and spun other fabrics than street yarn.


The exercises were enlivened with sweet strains from the Brattleboro Cornet Band, and made cheerful by the singing of old fugues in the dolorous and nasal style of the Puritanical school. "Old Mr. Nichols," an octogenarian, drew the bow across the same fiddle that sixty years since he used in inspiring the heels of the lads and lasses in the stately minuet, the laborious contra-dance, or the rollicking break-down.


"Bob," as a colored gentleman of the old school, acted as master of ceremonies; and a very sensible, aristocratic nigger, one duly impressed with the importance of maintaining an unsullied reputation, such as became a nigger that had never degenerated to the level of white folks, he made.


The whole affair was very pleasant. We learn that about $150 was realized.


Vermont Phoenix, March 14, 1857.


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